Category: color psychology

Pantone Color of the Year for 2018
The politics of purple

The Pantone Color of the Year for 2018 is Ultra Violet, specifically 18-3838. Pantone says of this year’s pick, “A dramatically provocative and thoughtful purple shade, 18-3838 Ultra Violet communicates originality, ingenuity, and visionary thinking that points us toward the future.”

It goes on, “Nuanced and full of emotion, the depth of PANTONE 18-3838 Ultra Violet symbolizes experimentation and non-conformity, spurring individuals to imagine their unique mark on the world, and push boundaries through creative outlets.”

Another person at Pantone (and by her comment you can tell she not only voted hard for Ultra Violet but is maybe also into recreational herbs, mood rings, and charting her chakras) said “Pantone Ultra Violet takes our awareness and potential to a higher level. From exploring new technologies, and the greater galaxy to artistic expression and spiritual reflection—intuitive Ultra Violet lights the way to what is yet to come.” Good grief, People of Pantone, can’t you just say, “We heart lavender”?

As for the actual choice of color, I feel that after this past year, maybe Pantone was looking for a shade to soothe the soul and calm the crazy, maybe even attempting to cross the aisle color-wise. Something.…blend-y.

I mean I don’t think even the all-powerful Pantone would dare make the Color of 2018 any sort of red. Meddling Russians and Republicans are red. Gerrymandered states, Trump’s X-long taped-together ties and the caps of a dwindling number of his supporters are red. We’re anti-red, America. And the zenith of our not-red was and is an absolute sea-to-shining sea of bright pink pussy hats.

But blue? Well, sure, we’re blue but frankly it’s currently more a widespread state of depression and daily panic—not a color that we’re able to effectively rally behind. Yet. We’re trying. We’re working on that rally in hometown elections and massive marches. We’re speaking up, stepping up, signing up. Pushing those tables together rather than building walls. Political-election-wise the closest we’re getting to truly going blue is Doug Jones in Alabama—not exactly a mandate, but one step closer. Though Pantone does describe this year’s color as “blue-based”. Thank you, Pantone. Another step closer.

I will say some real shade of blue better be the Color choice for 2019 big time, but this year maybe Pantone understands we just need to feel that we’re working toward a balance. And as every art school student knows, mix red and blue and you get purple.

Welcome to 2018 and Ultra Violet. Please enjoy these various snippets of Ultra Violet in the wild and let's all imagine a brighter, bluer future.

–Barbara Combs

Pantone Color of the Year for 2017: Greenery

pantone-2017The Pantone Color of the Year for 2017 is Greenery, specifically 15-0343. Pantone says of this year’s pick, “A counterpoint to the dark malaise caused by the murky political climate around the world. Greenery burst forth in 2017 to provide us with the hope we collectively yearn for amid a complex social and political landscape.”

Good grief, that’s a helluva lot of expectation to put on one color that is basically Kermit eating at Shake Shack. In fact, I think I’d rather focus on that spunky frog enjoying a delicious burger and fries at my favorite addictive eatery than think of what else this particular color can symbolize. I mean, if Pantone is referencing the current politics in America, I think there might be a better color than one associated with money and swamps.

Pantone was founded in New York and is now headquartered in New Jersey but we’ll give them the benefit of the doubt about their global inspiration since their colors truly are the standard for color matching around the world. And actually, Greenery is a nice sort of bright neutral and much better than 2016’s Colors of the Year: baby pink and blue (excuse me, Rose Quartz and Serenity) for example. That particularly twee combination made every designer I know just shake their damn heads.

rose-quartz-and-serenityNot to mention the previous year’s color “Marsala” which reminded me forcefully of Friar Tuck’s bandage needing to be changed. Talk about a dark malaise.

marsala

But like a train that shows no sign of slowing however many rational arguments and marches are made against it, here we are with this Greenery. It may be already overused but I have to admit it looks fabulous in people’s yards if they have the money to pay for water, and is a staple in packaging, fashion, and home decor. Pantone also says it’s “trans-seasonal” and anything with the word trans in it is fine in my book so let’s pour a tall glass of green river and toast Greenery, Color of the Year 2017. And to help a bit with that murky political climate, let’s add a little absinthe in there as well. Also green.

For more from Pantone about this year's pick go here

-Barbara Combs

Be attractive. Dress your brand for success.

Second in a series, THE 5 LAWS OF GRAVITY FOR A MORE SUCCESSFUL BRAND.

When you're creating or recreating your website, smart design is more than decoration. Smart design makes even the hottest brands more attractive and sometimes the key is in keeping it simple. According to econsultancy, 40% of people will abandon a website if it takes longer than 3 seconds to load.

That can translate to other areas of your brand. Margin Media reports 48% of users as saying  that if they arrive on a business site that isn't working well on mobile, they take it as an indication of the business simply not caring. (stats pulled from the awesome Hubspot)

Color is key in web design as it is in other areas of marketing, maybe second in importance only to color in packaging. For your website, color can affect positive or negative growth pretty dramatically. Here's a clear and cool little infographic on color from instantshift:

color-in-web

It's important to be aware of trends in consumer reactions. Smart design + strategy is the recipe that helps your brand exert all kinds of gravitational attractiveness. Be the Ryan Gosling of branding and don’t be afraid to channel your inner heartthrob.

2014 Pantone Color of the year: Not-so-Radiant Orchid

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Color of the Year for 2014 is Radiant Orchid, specifically Pantone 18-3224 for those of you who love to be exact about such things. And thank god for it as last year’s color was Emerald which was actually too depressing to even blog about. Pantone announced this year's pick as “vibrant, captivating—and suddenly everywhere. With a harmony of fuchsia, purple and pink undertones, Radiant Orchid emanates great joy, love and health.”

Awesome! The only problem is, on closer inspection Radiant Orchid ain’t really all that radiant. In fact, it's pretty damned mauve. Exhibit A:

the-right-orchid

So we’ll embrace the orchid radiance only after we toss in a few real fuchsias, purples and pinks. Check it out.

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You should visit the fab sites where we grabbed some of the crazy cool stuff above: weddingomania.comstartclosein.blogspot.com, and fieldstonehilldesign.com

Color of the year for 2010. Not just for roadside jewelry stands anymore.

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Turquoise, specifically Pantone® 15-5519, has been crowned Color of the Year for 2010. If it makes you feel like slipping on your sarong and sipping a Coconut Willie by the pool…well, then you are a very strange young man. But on trend, apparently.

Pantone, the global authority on color and color standards for the design industry, says that Turquoise (which they inexplicably capitalize every time they mention it) “evokes thoughts of soothing tropical waters and a languorous, effective escape from the everyday troubles of the world, while at the same time restoring our sense of well-being.” It’s also the color of a ’55 Ford Station Wagon I once had that was actually the cause of many of my everyday  troubles but we’ll let that pass. Continue reading "Color of the year for 2010. Not just for roadside jewelry stands anymore."