Category: marketing

Smart Marketing (aka Smarketing):
Where Creativity Meets Business

What is a creative marketer? An Artist? Designer? Entrepreneur? All of the above?

‘Creative marketing’ was once an elusive term in the business arena; where ‘creative’ translated to artistry and ‘marketing’ equated to entrepreneurship. To the layperson, ‘creativity’ and ‘business’ are two distinct categories that exist in their own silos, never thought to overlap or intertwine.

But in today’s business landscape, it is expected that businesses think creatively and creatives be entrepreneurial.

According to the Harvard Business Review, business success is dependent on creative strategy; requiring companies to be scrappy and employ out-of-the-box approaches for long-term sustainability.

At Gravity, we don’t believe in limits, nor do we let boundaries define us. We are smart creatives who also identify as bad*ss marketers. We coin ourselves ‘Graviteers’ because we are forward-thinking forces of nature and our clients are paramount. All in all, intersecting creativity with a business mindset is our jam.

So, what do you call a smart-marketer? A Smarketer.

Cross a ‘Smarketer’ with a ‘Graviteer’ and you got yourself a ‘SMARKETEER’.

Now, how exactly do we, Gravity Smarketeers, intersect creative-thinking when doing business?

We…

  • Collaborate WITH customers. We go beyond a ‘customer-centric mentality’ and work with you to expand your brand.
  • Deliver complete EXPERIENCES for our clients, from project inception to finish.
  • Amplify IMPACT through inspiration. We are proponents for creative marketing—and enthusiasm is our middle name.
  • Develop creative STRATEGY. We bring creativity to scale and find tangible ways to measure project success.
  • Create enterprise VALUE. We know the measure of marketing success isn’t in the input, but rather the value of the output.

Employing creative-thought is imperative to our business strategy. How do you get creative?

Are you also a fellow creative-marketer? Leave us a comment below and tell us how you get scrappy! For more breadth on creativity in marketing - check out: "What Creative Marketing Looks Like Today".

 

-Maya Anderson

Be attractive. Dress your brand for success.

Second in a series, THE 5 LAWS OF GRAVITY FOR A MORE SUCCESSFUL BRAND.

When you're creating or recreating your website, smart design is more than decoration. Smart design makes even the hottest brands more attractive and sometimes the key is in keeping it simple. According to econsultancy, 40% of people will abandon a website if it takes longer than 3 seconds to load.

That can translate to other areas of your brand. Margin Media reports 48% of users as saying  that if they arrive on a business site that isn't working well on mobile, they take it as an indication of the business simply not caring. (stats pulled from the awesome Hubspot)

Color is key in web design as it is in other areas of marketing, maybe second in importance only to color in packaging. For your website, color can affect positive or negative growth pretty dramatically. Here's a clear and cool little infographic on color from instantshift:

color-in-web

It's important to be aware of trends in consumer reactions. Smart design + strategy is the recipe that helps your brand exert all kinds of gravitational attractiveness. Be the Ryan Gosling of branding and don’t be afraid to channel your inner heartthrob.

Brand Velocity. Fast and steady wins the race.

First in a series, THE 5 LAWS OF GRAVITY FOR A MORE SUCCESSFUL BRAND.

In the race for brand awareness and ultimately brand loyalty, if you’re not moving forward, you’re falling behind. The days of undivided attention have all but disappeared. First to market can have a big advantage in customer recognition, and recognition has been shown to markedly increase brand loyalty. So there may be a tendency to rush your launch, your site, your direct mail, get your product on the shelf, your app on the phone before anyone else.

But it’s not just speed that wins brand loyalty. Stumbling at breakneck speed can take you out of the race. The thing about clichés is, they're repeated over and over because they're true. And this one is one of the truest: You don’t get a second chance to make a first impression.

Have a plan that takes into account discovery, design, review and revisions and you won't have to limp back to the starting line because you missed the mark. Here's another cliché that really bugs me but mostly because it's most painfully true at the eleventh hour: There's never enough time to do it right but always time to do it over. Time is a crucial part of brand velocity.

Hire people that know what they're doing and will fuel your content, clarity, relevance, and differentiation—people that get your business and the target you're shooting for and will keep you honest and on schedule, and you will be on the fast track.

High on Branding. why we’ve got a need for weed

Or cannabis. Or pot or grass or bud or hemp or smoke or.... just plain marijuana. Anything but dope which is what we called it in the 1970s and which still elicits snorts of derision from my adult children when I say it. Unless it’s dope as in cool. Dope as shit.

Anyways, Now that recreational use is legal in Washington, I want a cannabis client for Gravity so bad I can taste it. Or smoke it. Whatever, the point is, there has never been a branding opportunity like this in the history of ever.

It’s going to need naming, voice, logo, marketing, packaging, creating a brand for something people have been jonesing to be legal for decades—millions using it illicitly—now suddenly this juggernaut, this leviathan of wrong and right and fun and ok/not ok product is going to be heading through the 12 items or less line with several packages of Doritos and Ding Dongs. Well there is simply no precedence for it. To a branding pro this is, pardon the pun, heady stuff.

Consider alcohol just after Prohibition. Same thing in terms of a percentage of the population always using it (making their own in the case of my Grandpa Roy) and then the liberation and libations when Prohibition was repealed. But branding and advertising were a whole other thing in those days and the breadth of products and ways to reach the audience were relatively small.

Now it’s 2014 and you’ve got a substance that millions of people want, still in a limited space with a limited supply but a wide range of ways to consume it: dried as always, oils, chews, baked goods, infusions, oh good grief, this is Everything.

And check out that target audience. Stoners, sure. No disrespect meant but like hardcore Christians and the second coming, they prayed this would happen and I can believe they are feeling the rapture. But even better and much more fun is that vast untapped, empowered, wealthy, maybe slightly hesitant but what the hell adventurous Chardonnay drinking 40-something female demographic. Okay, they don’t have to drink Chardonnay, it can be Proseco…point is, there are women who’ll want weed and that my friend is one awesome demographic. If you only market it to women, you could craft an awesome and lucrative brand is what I’m saying. But there’s more.

How fun, how new, how bad we want to boldly go where no brand has gone before. I can already imagine the smokesperson™…somebody uber cool and not too young and already a little messed up in the best way. Someone to help create the buzz. And the best part is, we’re all in on the celebration.

While many will be pushing the stuff out in whatever packs are handy and legal, there are already some stellar package designs out of Colorado and much much more to come. I’ve got to admit, even if Gravity doesn’t get in on the ground floor, I can’t wait to see how this market evolves. It’s gonna be so Far Out.

-Barbara Combs

Swag is a Battlefield

swagiswar

A recent Harvard Business Review article by Alexandra Samuel titled “The Science of Swag” started me thinking about promotional items and what our clients should really consider before producing tradeshow giveaways.

Equating swag to science is understandable, but the whole idea of how to influence people with varied incarnations of promotional merchandise when troops of other exhibitors are doing the same all around you, has become more than science. This is war. Continue reading "Swag is a Battlefield"